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Running Shoe Review: New Balance Vazee Prism

On Christmas of 2016, I badly needed a lightweight stability running shoes to replace my failing pair of 870v4. So, I bought a black and pink pair of New Balance Vazee Prism at New Balance Bonifacio High Street boutique with a 40% discount but, it took me a few months before I started wearing it.

This shoe review happens to be long overdue since the true test of this shoe happened between June and October 2017.

Type: Stability
Terrain: Road
Weight: 280.6 grams (9.9 oz) approx.
Size: Men’s 9.5 Wide (U.S.)
Color: Black and Pink
Toe drop: 8 mm drop: due to variances created during the development and manufacturing processes, all references to 8 mm drop are approximate
Price: PHP5795 (SRP)

Features:

  • Bootie construction
  • Full EVA (Ethyl Vinyl Acetate) Strobel board for all-day comfort
  • Medial post located on the inside edge of the shoe to help prevent overpronation
  • No-sew material application
  • Performance stretch lace
  • Synthetic/mesh upper

New Balance Vazee Prism is a fairly new line in New Balance performance running shoes at the time because they used model names instead of model numbers. Also, the use of Full EVA (Ethyl Vinyl Acetate) Strobel board for all-day comfort was quite innovative.

Initially, I ordered size 9 EE but it was way too tight. Instead, I bought a pair of size 9.5 EE and it has the right fit. The sleek design, no-sew material application, and padded heel collar, and reduced weight of the shoe and increased its comfort after wearing it all day, every day. The fit and feel reminds me of my all-time favorite New Balance model 870V3 only with much more breathable upper and softer and bouncier RevLite foam midsole.

There are also trade-offs in wearing the Vazee Prism. There was a forefoot slippage due to its over-flexibility and lack of security in the midfoot. I have to wear thicker socks and tighten its stretch laces to have a secured fit. There are also a few runners complained about the durability of the shoes’ upper. I had to run a few more kilometers to feel its responsiveness and flexibility while shifting gears. Also, Vazee Prism does not perform well while running on wet pavements.

It took less than 75 kilometers of wear before it became fully break-in. I am glad that my pair of Vazee became more comfortable and responsive when I wore it at the Chicago Marathon last October.

The Vazee Prism is very light and flexible for a stability shoe which was quite innovative at the time. My conclusion is Vazee Prism is a great shoe both for training and racing. It can even pass the criteria of a typical, traditional pair of racing shoes.

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